Top 5 Safety Tips For Traveling Abroad

Everyone wants their trip abroad to be safe and stress free. Unfortunately, sometimes travelers may face certain dangers and/or experience problems that can be easily prevented by practicing safe travel abroad tips. Here are 5 tips that can help you experience a safe trip abroad:

1. Carry a minimum number of valuables (if any)

It is never a good idea to carry your valuables around with you when touring a foreign country. Americans can easily become victims of theft. To prevent becoming a victim of theft: leave valuables at home, lock them in the hotel safe, or carry them in an inside pocket or pouch under your clothing to hide their visibility. This includes jewelry  credit cards, cash, and passports. Additionally, it is always better to carry credit cards vs cash because they can be canceled if stolen.

2. Leave a copy of your itinerary with family/friends

Always inform friends and family of when and where you will be. This way, in case of an emergency, they will know how and where to contact you.

3. Learn About Local Laws and Customs

The last thing you want is to insult natives to the country you are visiting, or worse, break their laws. Make sure to inform yourself of the country’s local laws and customs in order to ensure you are being respectful of them and their country. This will ensure you have a better traveling experience.

4. Be Aware Of Your Surroundings

Always travel in well lit areas and avoid traveling alone at night. Never discuss your travel plans or accommodations with strangers. Be aware and keep valuables close to avoid pickpockets. If you get lost, ask authority figures for directions.

5. Choose Safe Public Transportation

Never take an unmarked cab. If you are taking a train, do not accept food or drinks from strangers and lock up your valuables. If you are renting a car, avoid driving at night and park your car in well lit areas. Always keep your doors locked and drive away from suspicious individuals.

By adopting these safe travel abroad practices, you increase your chances of having a pleasant and wonderful vacation. For more information on safe travel abroad tips, visit The State Department here.

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Tunisia Travel Advisory: October 19, 2012

The Department of State cautions U.S. citizens of the dangers of travel to Tunisia. This is an update to the information on the current security situation in Tunisia posted on September 15, 2012. The warning is to inform the possibility violent demonstrations.

On September 14, 2012 the Department of State commanded the departure of all non-emergency U.S. government individuals from Tunisia, after the attack on the U.S. Embassy and the American Cooperative School in Tunis. While the Consular Section is open for public services, the Embassy’s ability to handle emergencies involving U.S. citizens throughout Tunisia is constrained.

The security circumstances in Tunisia remain chaotic. Episodes of civil unrest have happened throughout the country. U.S. citizens should avoid large groups and demonstrations as even demonstrations that start out as calm can become dangerous. U.S. citizens should be cautious of their surroundings and keep aware all times, and should regularly keep up with media coverage. U.S. citizens within Tunisia should make have emergency procedures, enlist their presence in Tunisia through the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP), and give their contact information to the embassy.

The Embassy is situated in the Les Berges du Lac suburb of Tunis. The Embassy telephone number is 216 71 107 000 and the Embassy fax number is 216 71 963 263. The Consular section can also be contacted by email at ConsularTunis@state.gov.

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Libya Travel Advisory — September 12, 2012

The Department of State advises U.S. citizens against all travel to Libya.  On September 12, 2012 the Department of State sent orders for the departure of all non-emergency U.S. government individuals from Libya, subsequent to the assault on the U.S. Diplomatic embassy in Benghazi.  The political attacks have increased in Tripoli and Benghazi.  The airports in Benghazi and Tripoli are open and U.S. citizens are advised to leave the country by commercial air.

U.S. citizens traveling to Libya should stay alert and aware, exclude unnecessary travel in the country, make their own potential emergency plans, inform the government of their presence in Libya through the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP), and give their current contact details and next-of-kin or emergency contact information.

For further information, U.S. citizens should consult the Department of State’s Country Specific Information for Libya.

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PASS Cards — What Are They and How Do I Obtain One?

A big concern for travellers is losing their passport while abroad. There are few things that could hamper a safe and relaxing vacation more that not being able to present the necessary documents at Customs. Luckily with a PASS Card, there is less concern if you are travelling in Mexico, Canada, the Caribbean, and Bermuda. A PASS Card, or a passport card as it is oftentimes called, can be more than just a great sense of security – if you are travelling in these countries it can actually be substituted for a passport in land or sea travel.

We do recommend to our customers that they have Passport when travelling to these countries, but a PASS Card is a great addition because it is much easier to keep it on your person than a Passport. Since a PASS Card is akin to a Driver’s License, you can keep it in your wallet or purse. Unfortunately Passports don’t have the same portability as a PASS Card and it can often be difficult to carry them around in your pocket or other bags.

Though you are not able use a PASS Card as an official substitution of a Passport when you travel by air or to places aside from the countries mentioned, it does not hurt to have it. As always, it is a good idea to keep a paper scanned copy of your passport with you at all times when you are travelling to other countries. If you do have a PASS Card at home we recommend bringing it with you though just in case. We can’t make guarantees about its effectiveness, but it may speed up the process of getting a supplemental Passport if you happen to lose yours while abroad. With a PASS Card and a paper copy of your Passport you will be in good shape with the United States Embassies in the unfortunate event of a lost or stolen Passport.

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Sudan — January 07, 2011

The Department of State warns U.S. citizens of the risks of traveling to Sudan, urges U.S. citizens to avoid all travel to the Darfur region of Sudan, and advises them to carefully consider the risks of travel in other areas of Sudan. A referendum concerning the separation of the Southern region of Sudan is scheduled to take place on January 9, 2011. Although the situation has been relatively calm since the elections held in April 2010, the period following the referendum in January 2011 remains unpredictable. This Travel Warning updates and replaces the Travel Warning issued on October 1, 2010, to note the political situation and to remind U.S. citizens of ongoing security concerns in Sudan.

Due to the near term potential for heightened political tension, the Department of State urges U.S. citizens to avoid all travel to the Darfur region of Sudan, and advises them to carefully consider the risks of travel in other areas of Sudan. The referendum concerning the separation of the southern region of Sudan is scheduled to take place on January 9, 2011. If the result of the referendum favors separation, southern Sudan will become an independent nation by July 2011. While the situation is relatively calm, the period following the referendum may be marked by political instability, civil unrest, the migration of persons between the north and south, and disruptions or delays in government services, particularly in the south.

While the Government of Sudan has taken steps to limit the activities of terrorist groups, elements of these groups remain in Sudan, and have threatened to attack Western interests. In January 2008, two U.S. Embassy employees were assassinated by a group of Sudanese extremists while traveling on a street in Khartoum. The persons who carried out this attack were convicted and sentenced to death by a Sudanese court, but escaped from custody in June 2010; three of the attackers remain at large. The terrorist threat level in the Khartoum area and in the Darfur region remains critical, and the U.S. Embassy has implemented enhanced security measures to protect U.S. Government personnel assigned to Sudan. These measures include requiring U.S. Government personnel to travel in government vehicles at all times, and to obtain advance permission for travel outside of Khartoum. In addition, family members under age 21 of U.S. Embassy personnel are not allowed to reside in Sudan.

If you are a U.S. citizen traveling or residing anywhere in Sudan, you should exercise caution at all times and closely monitor local and international news from reliable sources. Violent flare ups break out with little notice between various armed militia groups and Sudanese military forces, particularly in the Darfur region, along the border between Chad and Sudan, and in areas of Southern Sudan. You should avoid all public demonstrations and political rallies, as even demonstrations that seem peaceful can turn confrontational and become violent with little or no notice. Anti-U.S. and European demonstrations occur periodically, mostly in Khartoum. You should keep a low profile, vary your time and routes of travel, exercise care while driving, and ensure that your passport and Sudanese visa are always valid and up to date.

The threat of violent crime, including kidnapping, armed robberies, home invasions, and carjackings, is particularly high in the Darfur region of Sudan, as the Government of Sudan has limited capacity to deter crime in that region. In May 2010, a U.S. citizen working for a humanitarian relief organization was kidnapped in Darfur, and held for over three months before being released. A number of other foreign nationals have been abducted and held for ransom by criminal groups in Darfur. Because of the risk involved, the U.S. Embassy in Khartoum currently prohibits travel by U.S. Government personnel to Darfur without express authorization by the chief of mission.

The risk of violent crime in Juba, in Southern Sudan, is also high. If you are a U.S. citizen affiliated with humanitarian relief efforts in Darfur or in Southern Sudan, you should take measures that reduce your exposure to violent crime, and you should adhere closely at all times to the security policies and procedures of your organization.

We recommend that all U.S. citizens visiting or residing in Sudan maintain safe haven plans, as well as plans to evacuate the country on short notice should the situation warrant it. If the security situation worsens or if specific threats affecting the safety of U.S. citizens are discovered, we will make this information available through the U.S. Embassy website and by messages communicated through our warden system. Warden messages for U.S. citizens in Sudan can be found online at: http://sudan.usembassy.gov/warden_messages.html.

The U.S. Embassy in Khartoum provides services to U.S. citizens traveling to or living in Sudan. However, our ability to provide services to U.S. citizens in emergency situations outside of the Khartoum area is limited, and is dependent on security conditions. The ability of the Embassy to provide assistance to U.S. citizens is particularly limited in Southern Sudan and in Darfur.

You can stay in touch and get updates by checking the U.S. Embassy website,http://sudan.usembassy.gov. You can also get global updates at the website of the State Department’s Bureau of Consular Affairs, http://travel.state.gov, where you can find the current Worldwide Caution, Travel Warnings, Travel Alerts, and country specific information.

If you don’t have internet access, we have a toll-free call center for updates: 1-808-407-4747 in the U.S. and Canada, or outside the U.S. and Canada on a regular toll line at 1-202-501-4444. These numbers are available Monday-Friday, 8:00 a.m. – 8:00 p.m. Eastern Standard Time (except U.S. federal holidays).

If you are going to live in or travel to Sudan despite this travel warning, please take the time to tell us about your trip by enrolling in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP), found online athttps://travelregistration.state.gov/ibrs/ui. By enrolling in STEP, we can keep you up to date with important safety and security announcements. Enrolling in STEP will also make it easier for the Embassy to contact you in the event of an emergency. You should remember to keep all of your information in STEP up to date; it is particularly important when you enroll or update your information to include a current phone number and e-mail address. U.S. citizens without internet access may enroll directly at the U.S. Embassy in Khartoum or at the Consulate General in Juba.

The U.S. Embassy is located at U.S. Embassy Road, Kilo 10, Soba, Khartoum. U.S. citizens may obtain the latest security information by contacting the Embassy consular section at ACSKhartoum@state.gov, or by visiting the U.S. Embassy website, http://sudan.usembassy.gov. In the event of an emergency involving a U.S. citizen, contact the Embassy by calling 0187-022-000 (from inside Sudan) or (+249)187-022-000 (from outside Sudan); ask to be connected to the Embassy duty officer.

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Kenya — December 28, 2010

The U.S. Department of State warns U.S. citizens of the risks of travel to Kenya. U.S. citizens in Kenya and those considering travel to Kenya should evaluate their personal security situation in light of continuing threats from terrorism and the high rate of violent crime. This replaces the Travel Warning of July 24, 2009 to note areas of concern now include portions of Lamu district and provide additional cautions to U.S. citizens regarding potentially threatening circumstances.

The U.S. government continues to receive information regarding potential terrorist threats aimed at U.S., Western, and Kenyan interests in Kenya. Terrorist acts could include suicide operations, bombings, kidnappings, attacks on civil aviation as evidenced by the 2002 attacks on an Israeli airliner, and attacks on maritime vessels in or near Kenyan ports. Many of those responsible for the attacks on the U.S. Embassy in 1998 and on a hotel in Mombasa in 2002 remain at large and continue to operate in the region. Travelers should consult the Worldwide Caution for further information and details.

In July 2009, three NGO workers were kidnapped and taken into Somalia by suspected members of a terrorist group that operates out of Somalia. In November 2008, armed groups based in Somalia crossed into Kenya near the town of El Wak and kidnapped two Westerners. The U.S. Embassy in Nairobi has designated a portion of Kenya bordering Somalia and Ethiopia as “restricted without prior authorization” for purposes of travel by U.S. Government employees, contractors, grantees, and their dependents. Travelers should be aware that U.S. Embassy security personnel recently expanded the restricted area to include portions of Lamu district. This designation is based on reports of Somali-based armed groups known to have crossed into Kenya to stage attacks or to commit crimes. This restriction does not apply to travelers not associated with the U.S. government, but should be taken into account when planning travel. The restriction is in effect for the following areas:

-All of Mandera District.

-The entire area north and east of the town of Wajir, including travel on Highway C80 and areas east of C80 and an 80-kilometer (about 50 miles) wide band contiguous with the Somalia border. Travel to and within the towns of Wajir and Moyale remains unrestricted.

-Within Garissa District, an 80-kilometer (about 50 miles) wide band contiguous with the Somalia border. Travel to and within the town of Dadaab remains unrestricted.

-Within Ijara District, an 80-kilometer (about 50 miles) wide band contiguous with the Somalia border; Boni National Reserve.

-Within Lamu District, a 60-kilometer (about 40 miles) wide band starting northeast of Pate Island to the Somalia border. Towns and resorts within/contiguous to the Kiunga Marine Reserve are now included in the restricted area.

Violent and sometimes fatal criminal attacks, including armed carjackings, home invasions/burglaries and kidnappings can occur at any time and in any location, particularly in Nairobi. As recently as spring 2010, U.S. nationals were victims of carjacking and kidnapping. In the short-term, the continued displacement of thousands of people by the civil unrest of 2008 combined with endemic poverty and the availability of weapons could result in an increase in crime, both petty and violent. Kenyan authorities have limited capacity to deter or investigate such acts or prosecute perpetrators.

U.S. citizens in Kenya should be extremely vigilant with regard to their personal security, particularly in public places frequented by foreigners such as clubs, hotels, resorts, upscale shopping centers, restaurants, and places of worship. U.S. citizens should also remain alert in residential areas, at schools, and at outdoor recreational events.

U.S. citizens should avoid demonstrations and political rallies of all kinds. Most political gatherings are peaceful, but they can turn violent with no notice. In the run-up to the constitutional referendum in June 2010, six Kenyans were killed and 100 injured at a prayer meeting/political rally in Uhuru Park in downtown Nairobi.

U.S. citizens who travel to or reside in Kenya are urged to enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) in order to receive the most up-to-date security information. By enrolling, U.S. citizens make it easier for the Embassy to contact them in case of emergency. U.S. citizens without Internet access may enroll directly with the U.S. Embassy in Nairobi. The U.S. Embassy is located on United Nations Avenue, Gigiri, Nairobi, Kenya; telephone (254) (20) 363-6000; fax (254) (20) 363-6410. In the event of an after-hours emergency, the Embassy duty officer may be contacted at (254) (20) 363-6000. Travelers may also consult the Embassy home pagefor more information.

U.S. citizens should also consult the Department of State’s Country Specific Information for Kenya and the Worldwide Caution, which are located on theDepartment of State’s website. Travelers may obtain up-to-date information on security conditions by calling 1-888-407-4747 toll-free in the U.S. or outside the U.S. and Canada on a regular toll line at 1-202-501-4444. Stay up to date by bookmarking our Bureau of Consular Affairs website, which contains current Travel Warnings and Travel Alerts. Follow us on Twitter and the Bureau of Consular Affairs page on Facebook as well.

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Somalia — December 27, 2010

The State Department warns U.S. citizens of the risks of travel to Somalia and recommends that U.S. citizens avoid all travel to Somalia. This replaces the Travel Warning dated December 31, 2009, to update information on security concerns.

The Department of State warns U.S. citizens against all travel to Somalia, including northern Somalia. In August and September of 2010, terrorists launched a military offensive attack against the Transitional Federal Government (TFG) and African Union (AU) peacekeeping forces involving multiple attacks against local and international targets. In another attack on August 24, two terrorists launched a machine gun and suicide vest attack against the Hotel Muna, reportedly killing 24 people. On August 31, a roadside bomb exploded and damaged three civilian minibuses killing at least nine people and wounding 25 others, and on September 9, two suicide bombers killed themselves in an attack on Mogadishu airport.

There is no U.S. Embassy or other U.S. diplomatic presence in Somalia. Consequently, the U.S. Government is not in a position to assist or effectively provide services to U.S. citizens in Somalia.

Terrorist operatives and armed groups in Somalia have demonstrated their intent and capability to attack air operations at Mogadishu International Airport. Kidnapping, murder, illegal roadblocks, banditry, and other violent incidents and threats to U.S. citizens and other foreigners can occur in any region. Inter-clan and inter-factional fighting flares up with little or no warning. Unpredictable armed conflicts among rival militias are prevalent in southern Somalia, particularly in and around Mogadishu. This has resulted in the deaths of hundreds of Somali nationals and the displacement of nearly one million people.

The Sanaag and Sool Regions in eastern Somaliland, bordering on Puntland (northeastern Somalia), are particularly unsafe due to ongoing border disputes and inter-clan fighting. Lines of control in Mogadishu are unclear and frequently shift, making movement within Mogadishu extremely hazardous. There also have been several fatal attacks and violent kidnappings against international relief workers throughout Somalia, Somaliland, and Puntland. On October 14, 2010, a British relief worker was kidnapped in Adado, near the Ethiopian border and held for several days before being released.

U.S. citizens are urged to use extreme caution when sailing near the coast of Somalia. Merchant vessels, fishing boats, and recreational craft all risk seizure by pirates and having their crews held for ransom in the waters off the Horn of Africa, especially in the international waters near Somalia. If transit around the Horn of Africa is necessary, it is strongly recommended that vessels travel in convoys, maintain good communications contact at all times, and follow the guidance provided by the Maritime Security Center – Horn of Africa (MSC-HOA). U.S. citizens should consult the Maritime Administration’s Horn of Africa Piracy page(http://www.marad.dot.gov/news_room_landing_page/horn_of_africa_piracy/horn_of_africa_piracy.htm) for information on maritime advisories, self-protection measures, and naval forces in the region.

U.S. citizens who choose to travel to Somalia despite this Travel Warning are urged to enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) in order to receive the most up-to-date security information. Travelers to the self-declared “Republic of Somaliland” should register with the U.S. Embassy in Djibouti, and travelers to Puntland or southern Somalia should register with the U.S. Embassy in Nairobi. U.S. citizens traveling by sea to the area of high threat are urged to inform MSC-HOA by emailing postmaster@mschoa.org, with the subject line ‘Yacht Vessel Movement.’ U.S. Embassy Djibouti is located at Plateau du Serpent, Boulevard Marechal Joffre, Djibouti City; telephone (253) 35-39-95; after-hours telephone number (253) 35-13-43. The mailing address is Ambassade Americaine, B.P. 185, Djibouti, Republique de Djibouti, and their workweek is Sunday through Thursday. U.S. Embassy Nairobi is located on United Nations Avenue, Gigiri, Nairobi, Kenya; telephone (254)(20) 363-6000; after-hours emergencies (254)(20) 363-6170. The mailing address is P.O. Box 606 Village Market 00621, Nairobi, Kenya.

U.S. citizens should also consult the Department of State’s Country Specific Information for Somalia and the Worldwide Caution, which are located on theDepartment of State’s website. Travelers may obtain up-to-date information on security conditions by calling 1-888-407-4747 toll-free in the U.S. or outside the U.S. and Canada on a regular toll line at 1-202-501-4444. Stay up to date by bookmarking our Bureau of Consular Affairs website, which contains current Travel Warnings and Travel Alerts. Follow us on Twitter and the Bureau of Consular Affairs page on Facebook as well.

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Saudi Arabia — December 23, 2010

The Department of State authorized the return of all family members to U.S. Embassy Riyadh, U.S. Consulate General Jeddah, and U.S. Consulate General Dhahran, but continues to warn U.S. citizens about the security situation in Saudi Arabia and reminds U.S. citizens of recommended security precautions. The Department of State urges U.S. citizens to carefully consider the risks of traveling to Saudi Arabia. There is an ongoing security threat due to the continued presence of terrorist groups, some affiliated with al Qaida, who may target Western interests, housing compounds, hotels, shopping areas, and other facilities where Westerners congregate. These terrorist groups may employ a wide variety of tactics and also may target Saudi government facilities and economic/commercial targets within the Kingdom. This updates and replaces the Travel Warning issued February 18, 2010, to note the authorized return of U.S. government dependents to all posts in Saudi Arabia.

The last major terrorist attack directed against foreign nationals was in 2007. Significant measures since then by the Saudi government have greatly improved the security environment throughout the Kingdom. The Department of State has since authorized the return of all family members to U.S. Embassy Riyadh, U.S. Consulate General Jeddah, and U.S. Consulate General Dhahran. While these changes reflect a continued improvement in the security climate in Saudi Arabia, particularly in the Eastern Province and Riyadh, it is important to note that there remains an ongoing security threat. U.S. citizens who visit Saudi Arabia are strongly encouraged to take precautions when selecting hotels or housing compounds to ensure that stringent security measures are provided. In addition, U.S. citizens are always advised to be aware of their surroundings when traveling or visiting commercial establishments frequented by Westerners. U.S. citizens are also advised to keep a low profile, vary times and routes of travel, exercise caution while driving, entering or exiting vehicles, and ensure that travel documents and visas are current and valid.

If the security threat changes or specific threats affecting U.S. citizens are discovered, this information will be made available through the Warden System and U.S. Mission websites. Warden messages can be found on theU.S. Embassy Riyadh website.

All travelers are encouraged to enroll in theDepartment of State’s Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive the latest travel updates and information. Updated information on travel and security in Saudi Arabia may also be obtained from the Department of State by calling 1-888-407-4747 from within the United States and Canada or, from outside the United States and Canada, on a regular toll line at 1-202-501-4444. These numbers are available from 8:00 am to 8:00 pm Eastern Time, Monday through Friday (except U.S. federal holidays.) For additional information, consult the Department of State’s Country Specific Information for Saudi Arabia and Worldwide Caution. For after-hours emergencies, U.S. citizens may telephone the Embassy in Riyadh at (966) (1) 488-3800, the Consulate in Jeddah at (966) (2) 667-0080, or the Consulate in Dhahran at (966) (3) 330-3200.

U.S. Embassy Riyadh
International mailing address: P.O. Box 94309, Riyadh 11693.
Mail may also be sent via the U.S. Postal Service to: U.S. Embassy, Unit 61307, APO AE 09803-1307.
Telephone: (966) (1) 488-3800
Fax: (966) (1) 483-0773.

U.S. Consulate General Dhahran
International mailing address: P.O. Box 38955, Doha-Dhahran 31942.
Mail may also be sent via the U.S. Postal Service to: Unit 66803, APO AE 09858-6803.
Telephone: (966) (3) 330-3200
Fax: (966) (3) 330-0464.

U.S. Consulate General Jeddah
International mailing address: P.O. Box 149, Jeddah.
Mail may also be sent via the U.S. Postal Service to: Unit 62112, APO AE 09811-2112.
Telephone: (966) (2) 667-0080
Fax: (966) (2) 669-3078 or 669-3098.

Stay up to date by bookmarking our Bureau of Consular Affairs website, which contains the current Travel Warnings and Travel Alerts as well as the Worldwide Caution. Follow us on Twitter and the Bureau of Consular Affairs page onFacebook as well.

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Cote d’Ivoire — December 19, 2010

This Travel Warning is being issued to inform U.S. citizens that based on the deteriorating political and security situation in Cote d’Ivoire and growing anti-western sentiment, the Department of State has now ordered the departure of all non-emergency personnel and family members. The Department warns U.S. citizens to avoid travel to Cote d’Ivoire until further notice. This replaces the Travel Warning of December 16, 2010 to inform U.S. citizens of the U.S. Embassy drawdown and to update the security information.

Following the contested results of presidential elections, which were held on November 28, 2010, soldiers and loyalists of former President Laurent Gbagbo have now called for wide-spread demonstrations which are expected to turn violent. Hostility against westerners, including U.S. citizens, cannot be ruled out.

On December 20, the Department of State ordered the departure of all non-emergency personnel and family members. U.S. citizens who remain in Cote d’Ivoire despite this Travel Warning should consult the Department of State’s latest Country Specific Information for Cote d’Ivoire and Worldwide Caution Public Announcement at http://travel.state.gov. U.S. citizens may also obtain up-to-date information on security conditions by calling 1-888-407-4747 toll free in the United States or Canada or 1-317-472-2328 from overseas.

The U.S. Embassy’s Consular Section in Abidjan has temporarily curtailed all consular services except emergency services for U.S. citizens. Due to drawdown of consular staff, the Embassy has diminishing ability to assist U.S. citizens wishing to depart the country. The State Department recommends that U.S. citizens who are concerned about their safety take advantage of commercial means of transportation while they are available and while borders remain open.

U.S. citizens visiting or residing in Cote d’Ivoire are encouraged to enroll with the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) at http://travel.state.gov, by sending contact information including email and cell phone toCdiUnrestAmCitInquiry@state.gov or by leaving a voice mail at the citizen security information line: +225 2249-4001. Citizens without Internet may also leave a brief message by calling that same number and following the prompts.

Current information on safety and security may also be obtained by calling 1-888-407-4747 toll-free within the United States and Canada, or, for callers outside of the United States and Canada, by calling a regular toll line at 1-202-501-4444. These numbers are available from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. Eastern Time, Monday through Friday (except U.S. federal holidays).

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